Author: Censis Client Services

Say goodbye to Indeed and Monster. For job seekers and employers in the sterile processing space, the International Association of Healthcare Central Service Materiel Management (IAHCSMM) has a job site built specifically for our industry. Whether you’re looking for your next career move or your facility has a number of positions to fill, IAHCSMM’s Career Center can help you make the connections you need.

The Career Center: What It Is and How It Works

The Career Center serves to connect SPD professionals with the employers that need them—both through active and passive means. SPD professionals can post their resumes, search available jobs, and set up job alerts with specific criteria of what they’re looking for. SPD employers can post jobs, manage applications through the Center, search posted resumes, or set up email alerts for new resumes that match the candidate criteria they’ve set. 

The Career Center’s main distinguishing feature is that the platform is specific to the central service (aka SPD) profession. Rather than sorting through a bunch of unrelated jobs or candidates that may have no interest or even experience in health care, job seekers are only served up postings for central service jobs and employers are connected with qualified central service candidates.

Benefits for SPD Job Seekers

Online recruitment sites are nothing new. Just about anyone who’s changed jobs in the last few years probably found that job through some sort of digital technology—whether a recruiter reached out on LinkedIn or the employee applied through a posting on a site like Monster or Indeed. 

Other job sites enable job seekers to post their resume to that recruiters and job posters can find it, but IAHCSMM’s Career Center offers the benefit of knowing that anyone who looks at your resume is actually in the sterile processing space. This could improve your chances of connecting with a hiring manager in the industry.

The Career Center also enables job seekers to set up job alerts, so rather than browsing postings for hours on end, job seekers can sit back and let the SPD job postings come to them.

Bonus: The Career Center is completely free to job seekers.

Benefits for SPD Employers

Although employers have to pay to use the Career Center, the service connects them directly to a qualified pool of SPD talent. Before anyone has the chance to apply to an employer’s job posting, the employer can search posted resumes for qualified candidates—and reach out to any candidates that might be a fit. Employers can also set up email alerts for when a new resume is posted that fits their criteria.

In addition to being a place to post job openings, the Career Center enables employers to manage applications within its interface (employers can opt-out of this and have applicants directed to their company’s internal application if desired). 

According to IAHCSMM, the Career Center currently has more than 57,000 searchable resumes, and on average, job postings receive more than 200 views. Employers can view reports on how their job postings stack up in terms of views, number of applicants, and the number of times the posting was sent directly to job seekers through email alerts. In addition, the jobs posted on the Career Center are searchable through Google for Jobs, so candidates don’t need to begin their search on IAHCSMM’s website in order to find employers’ postings.

In a low unemployment economy, it’s more important than ever for employers to get on the radar of interested job seekers. IAHCSMM’s Career Center enables SPD employers to do just that, connecting them with qualified candidates who already know what SPD is about and want to advance their careers in this challenging yet crucial field.

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References

¹ Blanchard, K. (2010). Leading at a higher level. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

²Axelrod, E. M., & Axelrod, R. H. (1998). The conference model: Engagement in action. Organization Development Journal, 16(4), 21. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/197984206?accountid=7374